Impossibility of Same Sex Marriage
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FAQ: Why is the Church so homophobic? If two people love each other, shouldn't they be allowed to get married, regardless of their sex?

FAQ: Why is the Church so homophobic? If two people love each other, shouldn't they be allowed to get married, regardless of their sex?

The Catholic Church promotes the dignity and welfare of every human individual regardless of whom they are sexually attracted to. The Catechism of the Catholic Church teaches that those with homosexual tendencies must “be accepted with respect, compassion and sensitivity” (2358) and “every sign of unjust discrimination in their regard should be avoided.” (2358) It does, however, teach that the meaning of human sexuality is found within the context of the life-long commitment of one man and one woman whose love (when enacted sexually) is potentially pro-creative.

This means that any decision to engage in sexual activity outside of such a union is wrong; both for people attracted to the opposite and the same sex. Marriage is, therefore, not understood by Catholics as merely an expression of love between two people. It is a union that exists to ensure children are nurtured by their own parents who profess a commitment to their welfare for as long as they live. It is only the sexual union of a man and a woman that has the potential to produce new life and, for this reason, it is the only sexual union approved of by the Catholic Church. That is why the state has given public recognition and special protection to this institution. The slogan “Equal Marriage” can only have any meaningful application when we know what marriage truly is.

Faith Magazine

September-October 2016

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